THE POWER OF PAPER IN THE DIGITAL AGE

A client that I represent that will remain anonymous has upgraded the
database client to a web-app solution that is not working as planned at
all.

Modern culture is so accustomed to requiring the use of a computer to
do most clerical tasks, that it is difficult for me to remember my
mother typing, my dad filing, flipping through a Rolodex, or using a
dictaphone machine, yet, when the computers can’t do the job, we turn
to…  writing stuff down.

The mountain of paperwork that can come from an outtage makes me think
to myself…  Catalogue ordering is much older than the PCs I see
in the cubicles.  There’s no way Sears took their orders on old
IBM beasts for the history of the catalog.  How did they
sort?  How did they fulfill orders?  How many orders came
in?  How many mistakes were made in the process?

At the end of the first day of the software not working right was a
pile of manually written requests.  I understood the volume of
calls arriving, so it didn’t surprise me.  What _did_ was airing
in the break room on television.

To prove a point as to how poorly the Department of Homeland Security
is run, a senator placed a three foot tall pile of papers.  It
appears that a huge stack of reprosessed dead trees makes a larger
impact in a debate than stating, ‘I’ve received over 2 MBs of email
about the department since its inception!’

Is this a testament to how poorly people take to new things?

Thank you all for the input.

The project I thought about sharing and commenting on in this website
is as of yet incomplete, though all it needs is some bulletproofing and
the code that makes it initialize for new users, both just a matter of
me sitting down and writing the code.  It’s a checkbook written in
the language Ruby, and the program already has some hangups and caveats
that I’d love to expose in public once I know the program will work for
just about anyone that tries to run it.

I also have a PHP example I can share if I get the permission of the person for whom it was written…

I hope everyone’s doing well.

See you next time.

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